Passion and Pain

Some time back I had the privilege to be “Artist of the month” in the Timani newsletter and as this was a decidedly new experience I thought I´d share it here, also since the questions of the interview brings up the topic of strain injuries and of having your passion linked to pain, which I think is a big and important topic.

Artist of the month: Miriam Hlavatý

Timani newsletter, March 2017

Did you ever suffer from pain when playing, or think that your body is against you? Then I highly recommend to read about the amazing Timani teacher Miriam Hlavaty in the interview below!

I admire Miriam for the passion she has for musicians’ possibilities to learn about the body and mind. She has already taught Timani at the conservatory in Tromsø and Performance psychology at the conservatory in Trondheim, as well as giving Timani courses in several countries. She is also an amazing composer, a Nutritious Movement instructor, a specialist in listening (hence her website www.thelisteningexperience.com), and she plays the piano with refinement, great sound and musicality. I am just very happy to have met this person and to have her teaching Timani. I highly recommend her teaching if you are considering taking a Timani lesson. Her next weekend course in Timani will be in Oslo on the 5th-7th of May. Don’t miss it:)

T: When did you begin with Timani?

I started practicing Timani in 2013 when I attended my first weekend course and signed up for the certification training.

T: How have you benefited from taking lessons in Timani?

At that time I suffered from several playing-related strain injuries and had all but given up on piano playing after having fought my way through a Bachelor and Masters degree at the Norwegian Conservatory of Music. The various physical obstacles had stopped me from pursuing a traditional career as a pianist but they had also forced me to become creative and find other possibilities, for instance in the world of contemporary music with its extended piano techniques, into experimental music and, as a lecturer,  into the realm of musical perception and listening. This was a result of signing up for a course in Sonology which was taught at NMH by the composer Lasse Thoresen who later became my mentor during my Masters. All of this is today present in my work.

A friend of mine from the conservatory recommended that I try a weekend course in Timani. She had experienced some of the same strain injury difficulties as myself and knew how fed up I was with trying out every new cure that was on the market. Even so she succeeded in convincing me to give it a try. I remember I was very skeptical at first having experienced several disappointments earlier with other types of methods and systems. At the end of the weekend course everything had changed.

For the first time in 20 years I was given clear and understandable information which told me not only what I had been doing which had sustained the strain injuries and kept them returning again and again, but what was more important: I was given tools in the form of concrete  anatomical, neurological and biomechanical knowledge on how to do things differently, along with exercises in order to make it possible for me to do things differently.

At the end of the weekend course I signed up for the certification-training. I very rarely take abrupt or impulsive choices, I’m usually the kind who needs to ponder things a lot but this was one of the few times in my life when I knew I was in the right place and that this was a moment and a chance not to be missed.

T: You are now a Timani Advanced teacher and have completed the three year certification training.  Would you talk a little bit about how this has affected you?

Apart from recovering from the strain injuries I have finally found that which allows me to express what I need to express through my music, not by becoming the traditional pianist I thought I wanted to be, but by giving me access to the versatile and wondrous instrument that my body now is becoming in terms of playing and expressing music. Composing and experimenting with the instrument has also become a very important path for me.

Also, what I have gained through Timani has gone much deeper than mere technique and physical development.

Living with chronic pain and especially with pain which is linked to doing what you love the most affects you, physically and mentally. There is nothing which drains you more than having your greatest joy in life constantly associated with pain and discomfort. Living with constant and chronic pain also affects the endocrine system of the body. For a period of time I was forced to go on medication in order to dampen the excess production of cortisol and stress hormones, an excess production which was the result of living with chronic pain. During experiences like this it really is no wonder that you begin to hate your body and think of it as something working against you, actively thwarting your greatest wish: to be able to play music.

I would therefore say that the greatest benefit for me becoming an advanced teacher is the ability to see the body not as an adversary but as an incredibly logical construction which is constantly adapting to how it’s being used and under which conditions it has to function. And therefore also as adaptable to an almost unlimited degree.

This helps me to relate to other peoples problems in a different way and hopefully makes me a teacher and a lecturer worth trusting.

I have also found great pleasure in becoming more of a body nerd. I’m taking additional education into different systems of physical movement therapy while at the same time having now the confidence and trust in my own intuition which allows me to once more explore the fields of composition and improvisation. This time not as a way to avoid a problem but out of the sheer joy of exploration.

T:  As a musician, do you have any dreams pertaining to physical and mental mastery?

I think being part of and working with something so heavily rooted in tradition as classical music, has some disadvantages. For instance: at a very early point you start to adopt certain concepts and beliefs concerning what being a musician is about and what it entails, especially  in terms of accepting certain things as inevitable, such as physical pain or discomforts, or a certain level of stress.

In some instances these beliefs are so strong that they might keep us from seeking help and convince us that this is an acceptable state of being if we want to live a life of music.

Therefore the realization that this might not be the case gave me a somewhat different perspective on what to accept as limitations in my life. I think that one of my biggest dreams is to be able to look at my musicianship and my life in general with even greater expectation when it comes to creative potential, artistic ability or my health in general.

T: What would you say to inspire musicians around the world?

The most amazing instrument you’ll ever play is the one you’re walking around in so learn to use it in the best way possible. The knowledge is available, don’t be afraid to seek it out.

Where does the music end and the listenig begin?

Musical jiggsaw-puzzles at Kamfest 2016

Our perception of reality is a highly individual matter: every day our mind is occupied by trying to create coherence between an unimaginable amount of fragments brought to us through our different senses. It is a bit like a game: you’re given certain pieces but how you combine them is up to you.

Art and music reflects this essential fact that we humans are not sharing one reality but rather perceiving myriads of different possibilities of reality, all interlaced and happening at the same time. We are all aware that two people might experience the same piece of music or art in entirely different ways. The music or the art work is the same and yet the experience differs.

The continued construction of our separate realities is a game which every human being plays continuously, whether we are aware of it or not but once we are aware of it it is possible to use it consciously. Within the world of music this sense of the possibility that lies in co-creation with the listener is more present in particular composers and their works than in others.

bent-sorensen

At the Kamfest 2016, the annual chamber music festival in Trondheim, Norway, the Danish composer Bent Sørensen is this year´s “composer in residence” and brings to the festival his unique flavour of musical landscapes. I first encountered his music several years ago when, as a Master student at the Norwegian Conservatory of Music, Bent Sørensen was one of the three composers around whose works I centred my thesis. That knowledge was deepened when, in 2007, Sørensen was composer in residence at Festspillene in Bergen where I was able to attend the performance of several of his works and was also able to conduct an interview with him.

Searching for the familiar un-known

From my very first encounter with his music, Sørensen’s works always held a strange and unique fascination. Perhaps it had to do with a lifelong love for jigsaw puzzles; as a child jigsaw puzzles held an endless fascination for a mind who was constantly looking for patterns. Or maybe it was the other way around: maybe the hour-long searching for pieces that would fit each other was the activity which triggered a lifelong fascination for pattern-seeking.

puslenoter

The search for patterns and form can be conducted both visually but also aurally and musically. When listening to music we are essentially listening for form. The listening mind is forever searching for an underlying pattern, something which will make what we hear “logical” and “understandable”. This is however not a logic and understanding based so much on intellectual concepts as it is based on a sense of relationships, and acute sense that some parts are closer connected than others and that the entire piece therefore consists of a sort of pattern which is graspable if we are able to conceive it.

The Norwegian composer Arne Nordheim made a rather famous and much quoted comment of Sørensen’s music that “it reminds me of something I have never heard before” pinpointing this strange feeling of familiarity coupled with the sense of something unknown which the music of Sørensen triggers.

The music is all texture and movement, fragments and whispers which give rise to slips of memory. Unexpected qualities of sound (in several of his pieces musicians are asked to sing or hum while playing their instruments) and tempos which plays with our ability of perception and where fast moving sonic structures tricks the mind into a perception of larger, slower moving fields of sound, like millions of small rivulets of current creating the larger swellings of a river.

deserted-church

Listen to the piece The Deserted Churchyards where two lines of texture move together, one from above and one from below , crossing and departing- shimmering facets and velvety lines entwining and dancing, and where the glockenspiel also triggers the pictures of church bells swallowed slowly by an ever encroaching sea line (especially if you stay on to the end of the piece). 

The deserted Churchyards performed by Esbjerg ensemble conducted by Jules van Hessen

Another hot tip is the CD Birds and Bells with Oslo Sinfonietta, Christian Lindberg and Christian Eggen playing music of Sørensen for those who wish to submerge deeper into his music.

The Jigsaw puzzle that never stops

In one of the concerts in Bergen, which was given the title “Songs in rings of bells,” ten of Sørensen´s compositions were organized into a sequence where the different individual works were fused into each other in a long cycle. Some of the works were solo pieces, others were written for chamber ensemble.

According to Sørensen the challenge in organizing the concert laid in discovering the coherence and connection between pieces which were composed at different times but which still held the same subconscious element of connection, something, he stated, which had always been there.

In a way a composer´s entire output of works might be likened to the pieces of a gigantic jigsaw puzzle where each individual work relates to one piece of the puzzle, excavated with enduring and painstaking integrity from the composers unique musical landscape. In the concert in Bergen the fusing of the different pieces woke to life this sense of unfolding of a landscape which continued outside of its borders.

This hints to one of the most fascinating aspects of music: As an ever reflecting living prism, music changes and is affected by the setting in which it is presented. As humans we are multi-sensorial creatures: unless we actively shut off our senses, isolating only one at a time, our senses will forever fill out and enrich each other and our experiences. The same piece of music experienced on a train late at night with headphones or in a fully packed concert Hall during a festival are two entirely different experiences no matter if the music is the same. A person in love and a person with a dental appointment will probably colour their experience of the same piece of music quite differently. A piece of music, however well we might know it, is forever growing, sprouting new limbs, whispering in new voices and our possibility for experiencing it in new ways are endless.

The multiple realities of art and of humans

Just as all of our senses are engaged to a certain degree in every art- experiences we encounter, listening and perceiving art is also a highly co-creative experience.

My father worked, among other things, as a scenographer at the theatre, providing the visual parts and settings of the performance. His main creed was always that the less visual cues you give the audience, the greater liberty you are granting to their imagination and co-creation of the experience. Theatre, as well as music is a co-op: it demands the active co-operation of everyone involved and that includes the audience/listeners.

svart-teater

From the rehearsal of the theatre performance Måne over gjøglarvogna, one of the first performances in Norway where black light theatre was used, a form of theatre introduced in Norway by my father Karel Hlavaty. This performance was created in cooperation between my father and my mother, Nina Martins

The only reason why it is possible for a scenographer to depend on the co-creation of the audience or for a composer to depend on the aural jigsaw puzzle-skills of his audience is the knowledge that this is a central part of the human mind: the ability and fascination for filling out the picture, for joining the dots.

JSBachIn the suites for solo cello by Johan Sebastian Bach the cellist has four strings, four fingers and a bow at his or her disposal. Only two strings can be played simultaneously and therefore the possibilities for creating harmony and chords (three or more notes played simultaneously) is limited. How then is it possible to create the impression of more than one voice moving along?

The solution is to involve the listener as a co-creator: in his music Bach often implies harmony by having the cellist move between fragments of two or more voices. In the listener’s mind the fragments merge into two or three separate voices being played simultaneously and thus harmony is created. One way this is done is through arpeggios or broken chords, where the notes of the chord are played after one another but where the listener combines them in his head. Here is an example from the Allemande of the second Suite in d-minor.

Seen in a time perspective the notes are played after one another in succession along a horizontal timeline, the hallmark of melody, but in the mind of the listener harmony (the stacking of notes vertically) is nevertheless created.

Most of us are highly unaware of all the amazing processes happening inside ourselves when we are conceiving art; of how many amazing sensorial connections that are being made and contributing to our overall experience. If we were aware of this we might perhaps place less of an emphasis on the opinion of others to tell us how to think and feel about what we have just experienced and simply be present in the unique jigsaw puzzle-games of our amazing minds.

george_crumb_agnus_dei_detail

A detail from one of the beautiful scripts of American composer George Crumb

Maybe we should all be more in awe over our own creative ability when encountering music or art, an ability without which would render music and art as barren constructions and not as the amazing playgrounds for the mind that they are.

 

 

 

 

Jeg lytter, altså er jeg..

Lytting som eksistensiell erfaring eller hvordan høre det store mønsteret i en verden av fragmenter.

I Morgenbladet (av 13. april 2012) skrev vitenskapsjournalist Lone Frank om forskningsfunn som indikerte at multitasking, vår tids honnørord i arbeidslivet, ikke bare minsker effektiviteten vår (i tillegg til at den booster produksjonen av stresshormoner i kroppen) men også svekker innlæringsevnen. Distraksjoner i en hver form bidrar til at den kunnskapen som kommer inn går utenom langtidshukommelsen vår og dermed også blir fortere glemt. Men i dag hvor Google har tatt over rollen som vår langtidshukommelse (så lenge vi har internettilgang); hva er egentlig problemet?

Multitasking

Stikkordet er kontinuitet.

Multitasking og andre mentale flipperspill bryter opp vår opplevelse av kontinuitet og gjør oss mer sårbare for distraksjoner. Dette får konsekvenser for vår evne til langsiktig fokusering, altså å holde fokuset rettet mot én ting eller ett fenomen over et lengre tidsrom. I en hverdag som flommer over av flimrende sanseinntrykk via alle kanaler er evnen til å fokusere på én ting ad gangen ikke lenger en selvfølgelig evne.

Med manglende evne til å fokusere følger manglende evne til å oppfatte større former; former som strekker seg ut i tid og som derfor krever et langt strekk av fokus og oppmerksomhet for å oppfattes. Og det er her relevansen til lytting dukker opp.

Denne artikkelen dreie seg om hvordan denne oppmerksomhetsspredningen påvirker måten vi lytter til musikk på.

Form

Hva er form? Form er dét som holder og ordner deler sammen; dét som skaper helhet. Et ordnende prinsipp. Innen musikk er kunnskap om form og evne til å skape og å oppfatte former uvurderlig viten både for musikere, for komponister og for lyttere.

De tre gruppene danner til sammen en gjensidig påvirkende trekant i musikkopplevelsen:

Komponist musiker lytter

– komponisten produserer et veikart av effektive men samtidig begrensende symboler (også kalt noter eller partitur)

– utøveren/musikeren må fortolke disse og legge til sin egen faglige kunnskap og kulturelle bakgrunn (også kalt fortolkning)

– lytteren bidrar ved å bringe til bords sine egen personlige erfaringer og forventninger og mange av de forventningene er (uten at vi nødvendigvis er klar over det) knyttet til oppfattelsen av “form”.

Jeg forstå den ikke!

Som lyttere søker vi ubevisst etter form i musikken vi møter.

Innvendingen om ikke å “forstå” musikken handler som oftest i bunn og grunn om behovet for å finne en logikk i den informasjonen eller de lydene man står overfor og denne logikken ligger gjemt nettopp i musikkens “form” .

modern-music-cartoon

Komponisten Arnold Schönberg snakket om det han kalte “organisk form”. Dette begrepet brukes for å beskrive et ordnende prinsipp hvor alle delene i et musikkstykke forholder seg til hverandre som delene i en levende organisme: hver del har sin funksjon som forholder seg til, og påvirker, de andre delenes funksjon. Dette medfører også at hvis vi endrer én del vil det uvergelig få konsekvenser for alle de andre delene. Ingenting er upåvirkelig og adskilt.

Logikken i disse forholdene er basert på basale energilover: aksjon følges av reaksjon, oppbygging følges av utløsning, spenning av avspenning og det er rundt disse forholdene at den musikalske formen bygges opp; som et forløp av hendelser, som sekvenser og mønstre.

Likevel er dét å være i stand til å oppfatte disse mønstrene ikke nødvendigvis noe som kommer av seg selv, det må trenes og en av forutsetningene er nettopp evnen til å kunne fokusere lenge nok til å kunne oppfatte lengre forløp av hendelser. Det hele er litt som forskjellen på å betrakte et pointillistisk maleri på nært hold: helheten er kun tilgjengelig hvis vi tar ett par skritt bakover og utvider synsfeltet vårt.

For de som kan fransk, her er et eksempel på hvordan fargene i et bilde av Seurat skapes gjennom en optisk illusjon som krever, nettopp, avstand for å kunne oppfattes. Ta en titt her

Når det gjelder auditive opplevelser må avstand erstattes med hukommelse: fordi musikk er noe som foregår langs en tidsakse kreves det at vi er i stand til å huske begynnelsen av en frase når vi har nådd slutten av den for å være i stand til å oppfatte frasen som en helhet.

Og er det noe som virkelig hjelper på hukommelsen så er det gjentakelse.

Der hvor vi ved maleriet kan ta et skritt tilbake kan vi, når vi lytter til noe, lytte til det én gang til, i alle fall så lenge det vi lytter til er en innspilling. Spesielt når det gjelder et komplekst tonemateriale kan vi noen ganger være helt avhengige av opptaksteknologi for å få det nødvendige overblikket:

 Den musiske hval

På 1970-tallet ble “save the whales”-bevegelsen et verdensomspennende fenomen bla takket være utgivelsen av CD´en “Song of the Humpback Whale” hvor bioakustiker Robert Payne tok undervannsopptak av “hvalsang”, denne merkelige blandingen av klikking og høyfrekvente, plystrende og ulende lyder som hvalene utstøtte og som takket være vannets ledningsevne når det kommer til lydbølger, kunne nå over ufattelige avstander.

Hvalsang CD

Payne kom over de første opptakene av hval via en marineingeniør som hadde tatt opptak av de merkelige sukkende og ulende lydene mens han lyttet etter Russisk ubåtaktivitet nær Bermudatriangelet. Da Payne spilte av de lange opptakene av tilsynelatende tilfeldige lyder oppdaget han at det dreide seg om organiserte forløp av ulike lyder av forskjellig varighet som ble repetert helt nøyaktig, de korteste på litt over 6 og de lengste på over 30 minutter. Disse sekvensene eller “sangene” ble så gjentatt, noen ganger så lenge som 24 timer i strekk.

Hvalsang sekvens

Er du interessert i å lese mer om de fascinerende forsøkene til Payne kan du ta en titt her

Grunnen til at man først hadde oppfattet lydene hvalene produserte som tilfeldige var at enkelte av sekvensene hadde en såpass lang varighet at det var umulig for forskerne å huske dem når de endelig ble gjentatt. Men ved å høre på opptak som kunne spilles igjen og igjen ( og å se dem fremstilt som en visuell graf) var det derimot plutselig mulig å gjenkjenne mønstrene og sekvensene i lydrepertoaret som ble gjentatt, “formen” som gjorde at lydene gikk fra å være tilfeldige lyder til å bli “sanger”.

Poenget med dette eksempelet: En evne til overblikk er nødvendig for å kunne oppfatte mønster og jo større mønsteret er jo mer overblikk kreves.

Dette har betydning i langt flere sammenhenger enn bare ved musikkopplevelser:

Donald Trump

I politikkens ytre fløyer falbys gjerne de enkle løsningene som kan forklares med noen velvalgte slagord. De små fragmentene som er lette å slynge ut og enkle å oppfatte og som samtidig skaper et verdenssyn hvor vi ikke føler verken tilhørighet eller ansvar for omgivelser og medmennesker. For å kunne ta et mentalt skritt tilbake og se en større sammenheng trengs evnen til å kunne holde et lengre fokus, evnen til å oppfatte en større form.

Uten denne evnen blir de små fragmentene den eneste tilgjengelige virkeligheten, og vi ser ting kun ut ifra vår egen synsvinkel, ute av stand til å se ”det store bildet”, ute av stand til å oppfatte oss selv som del av en større form.

The soundtrack of our time

Hver trend vil til syvende og sist fremkalle sin motsats for å skape balanse. Derfor er det kanskje ikke overraskende at i en tid hvor det flimrende og hektiske er allestedsnærværende oppstår det en økende interesse for musikk som sier det motsatte.

“Before, my pieces were like objects; now, they’re like evolving things.” – Feldman

Innen den klassiske musikken har i de siste årene musikken til komponister som Morton Feldman vekket en stadig bredere interesse. Feldman som levde fra 1926 til 1987 er kjent, bl.a for sin unike kontemplative musikk. Vi snakker om musikk som oppleves best gjennom et par lyddempende øretelefoner eller fra en strategisk plassert stol i et lyddempet lytterom – musikk som krever fullt lytterfokus.

morton-feldman

Feldman skal ha uttalt at jo lenger et stykke er jo mindre materiale trenger du som komponist og flere av stykkene hans som kan vare opptil flere timer er ytterst sparsommelige når det gjelder tonemateriale så vel som dynamisk variasjon. Til gjengjeld byr de på en, i vår tid, unik mulighet for langsiktig fokusering og krever et lytterfokus av en helt spesiell kvalitet.

Det dreier seg ikke om fokusering med den hensikt å få kunnskap og stimulering men heller en egen form for dyp iakttakelse.

Feldman selv påpekte hvordan hele hans generasjon var fanget i trenden med å komponere stykker som lå innenfor et 20-25 minutters forløp pr sats og at når lengden på et helt verk oversteg én til én og en halv time dukket helt nye utfordringer opp, utfordringer som endret hele form-begrepet.

 Musikk uten tid

En av de mange definisjonene av musikk er at det er “organisert lyd” og i en organisering spiller gjerne tidsaspektet en viktig rolle. En melodi er enkelttoner satt i en bestemt rekkefølge. De får dermed en utstrekning i tid i motsetning til et bilde som kan oppfattes i et glimt.

Men når denne utstrekningen blir lang nok og materialet som fyller den sparsomt nok slutter vi å oppfatte musikken som lineær, i stedet begynner musikken å påvirke vår oppfattelse av tid:

For å oppleve at noe utvikler seg trengs det som regel variasjon, at noe nytt presenteres. Når noe gjentas identisk i lang tid opplever vi det som statisk. Det musikalske materialet hos Feldman er små elementer som både gjentas og varieres men fordi materialet er så sparsomt føler vi i liten grad at det beveger seg. Samtidig skjer det hele tiden subtile endringer i dette materialet. Denne paradoxale kombinasjonen av variasjon og stillstand bidrar på et vis til å svekke vår oppfattelse av tid som noe lineært. I stedet presenteres vi for dét som, i musikalsk form, tilsvarer evigheten: en opplevelse av et vedvarende “nå” uten begynnelse eller slutt. Som et havblikk for ørene.

 Stille vann

Interessant nok kan slike lytteropplevelser noen ganger skape sinnstilstander som er sammenlignbare med dem som ofte søkes og oppstår i flere former for meditasjon. Grunnen er kanskje at svært mange opplever denne formen for bevissthetstilstand som svært nærende. Hele tiden balanserende: rolig men ikke passiv, kontemplativ men ikke likegyldig, aktiv men ikke rastløs.

Dagens oppfordring med etterdønningene av påskeferie fortsatt i kroppen: Skru av mobilen, innta øretelefonene og lyttestolen og ta et mentalt og sanselig lydbad i Feldmans verk for piano solo “For Bunita Markus” (innspillingen av pianisten Sabine Liebner anbefales, den ligger ute på Spotify) og kjenn hvordan hjernen reagerer på å utsettes for forløp av en slik dimensjon.

CD Morton Feldman musikk

Her er en annen versjon tilgjengelig via youtube 

 

An artistic meeting beyond time

Last Tuesday, the 5 of January the great composer, conductor and pianist Pierre Boulez passed into eternity. As a lifetime explorer of new musical dimensions he has, for me, been a great source of inspiration. The following is an imagined meeting which I personally would have loved to witness and a small tribute to the great and timeless minds of three immaculate artists who, in my view, share the common feature of fearless exploration into Art: Pierre Boulez, Pablo Picasso and Johann Sebastian Bach.

So what if it were possible to create a quiet place beyond the limits of time and allow these three to meet for an amiable chat concerning life and art? To erase the years between them and let them meet as equals, each formed by his own time but also at the same time combined in their mutual love of Art and their own work. What if it were possible to let them meet on neutral ground in a half-fictional setting but at the same time partly real?

The setting of this experience owes its imagery to the books of Lawrence Durrel “The Alexandria Quartet” and Keith Miller “The Book on Fire”. Other sources of inspiration used are: http://www.baroquemusic.org/bqxjsbach.html, an interview with Pierre Boulez by the Magazine Musikblätter (Interview: Wolfgang Schaufler, Transcript: Christopher Roth, Baden-Baden; December 2010) © Universal Edition and a lifetime of quotes, tidbits and remembrances from books, articles and half-heard stories.

Please bear in mind that this is meant as a purely fictional meandering and respectful hommage to three men who have and will continue to have a profound impact on music and art everywhere.

An imagined meeting. Pablo Picasso, Pierre Boulez and johann Sebastian Bach

AlexandriaPablo Picasso, Pierre Boulez and Johann Sebastian Bach are meeting over a pair of Havana cigars and cognac on the terrace of a bar overlooking the harbour in Alexandria. The sky is tall and bright and the three gentlemen are immaculately dressed in white linen suits. Bach has lifted off his wig and placed it on the chair beside him, fanning himself lightly with Boulez´ Panama hat. Picasso squints eagerly into the sun while his hand moves ceaselessly over the drawing pad on his lap. When Boulez urges him to take a short break he excuses himself saying that as he has vowed never to write a diary (to the relief of many of the husbands of his previous mistresses) his pictures will be his only memoires and the pages of his life’s Journal, and this occasion certainly merits to be remembered.

As three friends of old, connected through their creative ideas and passion for their work there is little need to discuss seemingly irrelevant facts like differences in age and language. Instead the conversation invariably turns towards familiar elements like work and life.

Since neither of the three has ever been burdened with unnecessary shyness the conversation flows freely and amiably.

Bach, having finally obtained a position at the Thomas school in Leipzig shares his joy over the new possibilities such a position offers with his friends and the conversation turns towards the subject of artistic freedom.

Boulez: I believe I have finally begun my quest towards my own freedom, friends. I feel as if I have been confined to the crudest building blocks by a hoarding older brother for many years and now he has left home and all of a sudden I found the door to his room ajar and sneaked in and upturned the box under his bed and got creatively drunk on the riches I discovered there!

In many ways you know, Arnold was like a bigger brother to me in creative spirit. Coming home with his bag stuffed full of a strange new language and impressing everyone at the family reunions. I was impressed as well, I admit it. And I learned a lot but at the same time my thoughts were inevitably straying towards the eternal Cain-motif. I needed more, I needed to break free and conquer my own land, my own language, a language with infinitely more freedom than his. And so I began to assemble the blocks in an entirely different way and according to a completely new system, my system.

My system would be a system in which freedom was essential like the totem of the entire country, a freedom like the empty workshop of a mason where only the hammer lies resting on the bench, waiting.

Picasso: But there is always freedom! How else could you create if you have not freedom? If you be a true man your work is bound to be your own and therefore, of course, free.picasso portrett

Bach: But the system is the essence here, Pablo! After all, what is structure and system but a blueprint that shows us the inner structures of existence, no less. No structure, no creation. Of course like all things containing great power it must be mastered…

Picasso: Like with any woman or any blank canvas..

Bach: Never the less it can be mastered but it takes time and hard work, it does not simply fall into one’s lap. Then of course you have to endure the experience of having your beautiful structure completely disintegrated by a third rate musician who cannot even be bothered to play the correct rhythmical ornamentation.

Picasso: For me the system comes with the gut-impulse. I always paint objects as I think them, not as I see them, therefore any system inherent in my thoughts invariably shows itself in my work, I cannot put it there intentionally in order for the art to emerge within it.

As for your talk about Cain-motifs, Pierre: in my opinion every creation starts with destruction. You have to rid yourself of or deliberately destroy any previous notion of what you think you know about something when attempting to describe it. How else can you gain access to its essence, and once you’ve found that: how else can you make an accurate description of it?

Boulez: I believe that is something I can relate to. What finally gave me my stand against my Viennese brothers: I needed to be allowed to describe, to be a painter! You really cannot just be constructive all the time; you have to be descriptive, as well!

Picasso: Perhaps you would like a canvas? But of course when describing something the real question is always “who are you describing for?”

I have been describing the world to so many people and in such an amount of different languages but it was not until I finally started describing it to myself that it really got interesting.

Bach: By “yourself”, you mean the divine core of your own self?

JSBach

Picasso: If there ever is or was a divinity he lives within the perfectly painted line of a woman´s back.. (Smiles)

Bach: Personally I would say that I have never doubted his presence in my music.

After all, gentlemen, did not the great Luther himself one state that it is “when music is sharpened and polished by Art that one begins to see with amazement the great and perfect wisdom of God in his wonderful work of harmony”

But the problem as I see it seems to be that in order to make a living and to be able to live with yourself while making it, your descriptions needs to be accessible to others as well as to yourself.

Unless of course you are very wealthy and may do as you please.

God knows I tried in my youth, my head bursting with the new ideas from the evening songs, with the new possibilities! All of these new ideas literally pouring from my fingertips! And what do they say?? “Surprising variations and irrelevant ornaments which obliterate the melody and confuse the congregation”. (Mumbles and reaches for his glass) As if three months is such an enormous amount of lost time…

Boulez: In that case I am thankful for our differences in time. At least I had the fortune of being born into a world where creating your own language can be seen as a valid line of work. Although of course merely trying to oppose old structures can easily get you artistically dismissed as an attention-hungry musician.

No, the skill that must be “mastered” has for me always been the skill of balance, the delicate balance between constructivism on the one hand and spontaneity on the other. For me, these are the two elements of a true musician.

Bach: Hah! Spontaneity! a lost art in deed. You know, there were times when I felt myself suffocating underneath all of these innumerable careful souls. People who lived by rules, never venturing outside of what they had been taught were possible. Especially the organ builders! At times I would give them all a good fright just to get back into a happy mood. Pulling out all the stops on the organ and letting the instrument make its loudest sound ever always made them all go quite white. I used to say that I needed to hear whether the organ had a good lung (chuckles) Ah, but that sound, gentlemen, what an experience!

You know, Pierre, I quite envy you your enormous palette of sound. What I could have done with such a palette…

Picasso: It is still just a palette. What use is a palette without the ability to wield the brush? Not that you of all people lack that ability, my friend. (smiles and places his hand briefly on Bach´s shoulder) My point is only that the wielding, or maybe more accurately the will to wield is infinitely more important that what you happen to be wielding at the moment.

Boulez: I must certainly say that your palette has changed considerably during your lifetime, Pablo. But at the same time your brush stays true.

(softly, far away the call from the surrounding muezzins starts weaving random harmonies through the afternoon air)Vindussprosser

Will you listen to that! You know, in spite of all this talk of brushes and personal ways of wielding them; sitting here with this magnificent view I am very glad that we decided to meet here as this journey has given me the possibility to enrich my pallet with new sounds and impulses, to absorb this culture and all of its lovely sounds and to take it all back with me to replenish my “brush”. I almost feel like a thief, hoarding riches into the purse of my imagination..

Bach: I was doing the same! There are some very interesting harmonic progressions happening here (pulls out a feather pen and ink bottle and starts jotting down a figured bass on the napkin)

Picasso: And of course you know, my friends, bad artists copy but good artists steal.

 

 

Musikk for ører og øyne

Dagens omfattende opptaksteknologi gir oss i dag tilgang på musikk overalt og i alle settinger. Musikk er på sett og vis blitt et legemsløst fenomen: det er i dag fullt mulig å ha hørt flere hundre pianokonserter uten noen gang å ha sett et flygel. Har det noe å si? Tatt i betraktning i hvor stor grad sansene våre vikler seg inn i hverandre og påvirker hverandre så er det fristende å tenke at  det ligger en lite forskjell her – at det visuelle aspektet ved en musikkopplevelse kan ha noe å si for den totale lytteropplevelsen.

Mens vi i dag nærmeste drukner i tilgjengelig musikk gjennom alle tenkelige kanaler og formater var musikk før opptaksteknologiens tilblivelse mer av en ferskvare og konserter var den eneste anledningen til å få oppleve den. Den musikalske opplevelsen krevde dermed at du som lytter var i nærheten av instrumentene som frembrakte musikken og dermed var den visuelle delen av en lytteropplevelse også knyttet til instrumentene og deres utforming. Særlig i tidligere tider kunne disse instrumentene anta ganske så imponerende former.

 Instrumentale møbler

På 17 og 1800-tallet var huskonserter vanlig i de øvre middelklasse-hjemmene. Musikkutdanning var en viktig del av spesielt unge damers allmenndannelse. Dermed var det også vanligere at instrumenter var en naturlig del av hjemmene og et mondent borgerhjem var gjerne forventet å ha i det minste ett tangentinstrument. Flere av disse instrumentene hadde dermed en visuell utsmykning som også gjorde dem til dekorative møbler.

Bildetekst: The Concert av Gerard ter Borch

The concert Gerard_ter_Borch

ClavecinRuckers&Taskin

Sammenlignet med dagens mer edruelige modeller kan tidligere tiders instrumenter imponere og beta oss med sin overflod av vakre detaljer.

Skulpturell skjønnhet og eksperimentering

9.1275404555.giraffe-piano

17 og 1800-tallet var også en tid hvor forløperne til mange av vår tids instrumenter gikk gjennom flere eksperimentelle stadier, både teknisk og utformingsmessig; sidespor som noen ganger endte i ganske fantasifulle resultater.

Giraffpianoet er et slikt kuriøst monster. I 1820 hadde herskeren av Egypt forært en giraff til zoologisk hage i Wien og alt i hele byen dreide seg plutselig om giraffer – fra hårfrisyrer og kjeks til utformingen av vinglass. I byens dansesalonger danset man en ny dans kalt giraffgalopp og på musikkfronten fikk man en ny instrumenthybrid: giraffpianoet – et flygel som var mindre plasskrevende og dermed lettere å bringes inn i middelklassens stuer. Instrumentet minnet om et flygel hvor den buede delen av instrumentkroppen var blitt kuttet av og plassert på høykant bak klaviaturet.  Giraffpianoet kom i flere fantasifulle utsmykninger og var en fryd for så vel øyne som ører.

734-090605Revival-GiraffePiano.standalone.prod_affiliate.79

Instrumentene på denne tiden ga altså lytterne en stadig variert strøm av visuell informasjon, gjerne med fokus på det som i tiden ble ansett som vakkert eller slående og det er fristende å tro at det visuelle også bidro i lyttesituasjonen.

Når visse HiFi-produkter i dag kan sies å nærme seg det rent skulpturelle er det en spennende tanke at det på et vis kan være et svar på tapet av den visuelle opplevelsen som nærheten til musikkinstrumenter en gang ga. HiFi industrien kan på et vis sies å ha tatt over ansvaret for å bringe den skulpturelle skjønnheten (som det før var instrumentene som sto for) tilbake inn i lyttesituasjonen.

mbl101extreme

Mbl´s  Radialstrahler 101 X-treme. Høyttaler og smykke i ett.

Det er kanskje ikke tilfeldig at Mbl i et intervju med monoandstereo.com beskriver denne kreasjonen som ” … high-end instruments that create genuinely lifelike music in your living room.”

Skiftende idealer

Skjønnhetsidealer har alltid vært kulturelt betingede fenomener og det er bare å bla i en kunsthistoriebok for å se at idealene har endret seg betraktelig oppgjennom tidene. Så også i instrumentverdenen: Selv om standardinstrumenter i dag fortsatt har en iboende skjønnhet er det ikke primært det visuelle aspektet ved dem som ansees som det viktigste. Først og fremst skal de jo kunne frembringe vakker musikk.

Allikevel finnes det de som fortsetter å legge vekt på det visuelle aspektet ved instrumentene, noen ganger med fantasifulle resultat.

schimmel-grand-piano-pegasus-by-luigi-colani

Når vi ser Luigi Colanis flygelfantasi ovenfor er det fristende å tenke at ringen er sluttet fra de visuelt overdådige eksemplene blant instrumentene på  17-1800 tallet og frem til i dag. Men instrumentet ovenfor er allikevel først og fremst et instrument. Hvis det ikke var i stand til å produsere lyden vi forventer fra et flygel vil det også tape en god del av sin status.

Men hva med instrumenter hvor det visuelle aspektet er like viktig som det auditive?

Syngende skulpturer

Som henholdsvis skulptør og ingeniør dannet brødrene Francois og Bernhard Baschet en uvanlig og fantasimessig eksplosiv kunstnerisk duo.

baschetbrothers

Fra 1950-årene og framover konstruerte de to franskmennene flerfoldige musikalske skulpturer hvor skillet mellom instrument og skulptur er ytterst vag. Brødrene selv så på verkene sine som skulpturer som også var i stand til å produsere musikk. Skulptur-objektene deres, som ofte består av materialer som metall, glass og tre, er både vakre å se på og fascinerende å lytte til.

Som grunnlag for det hele ligger en nitid utforskning av akustiske fenomener. Med vitenskapelig grundighet startet brødrene med å klassifisere allerede eksisterende musikkinstrumenter. De kom opp med en oversikt over fire grunnleggende egenskaper som gikk igjen hos de fleste av dem:

  •  Muligheten for å produsere periodiske vibrasjoner
  • Muligheten for å opprettholde disse vibrasjonene
  • Muligheten for å frembringe en skala og modulere tonehøyde
  • Muligheten for å forsterke en lyd

Med en metodisk grundighet gikk brødrene dermed i gang med å lage skulpturer hvor disse fire egenskapene skulle danne de grunnleggende premissene.

baschetinstrumenter

I tillegg bestemte de seg for å inkludere enda et element, nemlig resonatorer, elementer som kan bevege seg synkront med lyden som skapes og forsterke den. (Disse finner vi også hos enkelte musikkinstrumenter, blant annet har hardingfelen et dobbelt sett med strenger hvor det nederst er der for å vibrere synkront med og å skape resonans til klangen skapt av de øverste strengene.)

hardingfele

Av hensyn til resonansmulighetene ble metall derfor et viktig materiale i mange av skulpturene.

Er dét kunst?

Den uvante kombinasjonen av instrument og skulptur har også bidratt til å endre definisjonen av kunstbegrepet: Da de musikalske skulpturene skulle sendes til USA for å stilles ut på MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, ble de stoppet i tollen. Ifølge tollmyndighetene i USA var nemlig kunst på den tiden definert gjennom sin unyttighet(!) og siden skulpturene til Baschet-brødrene var i stand til å produsere musikk var de dermed ikke lenger unyttige og derfor pålagt 16% toll og avgifter.

Baschet plakat

Saken havnet i retten hvor Baschet-brødrene fikk god hjelp og støtte fra kunstmiljøet i New York og fra presedensen skapt av en tidligere rettssak rundt kunstneren Brancusi (Da Brancusi første gangen sendte sine kunstverk til USA for å stilles ut ble også de stoppet i tollen med en kommentar om at dette ikke var kunst men stener som ikke lignet noe og slikt noe var det toll på.) På lik linje med Brancusi vant også Baschet-brødrene frem i retten og de musikalske skulpturene deres bidro dermed til diskusjonen rundt hva som skulle defineres som kunst.

De instrumentale skulpturene gjorde stor lykke på museene hvor de ble stilt ut, for i motsetning til skulpturutstillinger flest som hadde et vell av små skilt med “ikke rør!” plassert rundt seg var Bashet-skulpturene akkompagnert av små skilt med oppfordringer til publikum om å “spille/leke” med verkene (en dobbeltmening ved bruken av ordet play). dermed var gjerne utstillingssalene fulle av voksne og barn som stimlet rundt verkene i lykkelig klanglig utforskning.

The Crystal Organ

cristal

Men for å utnytte de musikalske mulighetene til de skulpturelle instrumentene fullt ut var det nødvendig med musikalsk kompetanse og Baschetbrødrene startet et samarbeid med flere etablerte musikere hvor enkelte av skulpturene nå tok steget over i instrumentenes verden. Sammen med musikerekteparet Jacques og Yvonne Lasry etablerte de ensembelet Lasry-Baschet Sound Structures mens musikeren Michel Deneuve fikk en spesiell forkjærlighet for instrumentet Cristal  (også kalt The Cristal Baschet) og bidro til å utvikle dette til et virtuost instrument egnet både for solo spill og orkester som brukes i moderne musikk i dag.

Cristalen tilhører en gruppe instrumenter som kalles friksjonsidiofoner  hvor tonene skapes ved hjelp av friksjon, i dette tilfellet strykes glasstenger med fuktede fingre og vibrasjonene som skapes forsterkes så av store metallresonatorer som kan minne om enorme blomsterblad. (Teknikken med å produsere musikk ved å gni på glass har vært brukt i flere varianter helt tilbake til 1700tallet da  ingen ringere enn Benjamin Franklin utviklet glassharmonikaen, men mer om det en annen gang.)

En av dem som har innlemmet Cristalen i sitt klanglige univers er multiinstrumentalisten og komponisten Loup Barrow. Her er han i et spennende samspill med Cristal, Hang og Ondes Martenot med Locus Solus Orchestra:

Nye instrumenter og nye komponister

Det er kanskje lett at instrumenter som har et såpass sterkt visuelt særpreg ender opp som mer av en wow-effekt enn en musikalsk opplevelse, og det skal ikke nektes for at Cristalen er et slående innslag på en konsertscene. Med sin kombinasjon av vitenskapelig teknologi, estetisk skjønnhet og fantasieggende klangmuligheter er Cristalen og de andre lydskulpturene til Baschetbrødrene en moderne vri på tidligere tiders instrumentale fantasifullhet.

Samtidig er gjerne et instruments levedyktighet mest av alt knyttet til musikken som skrives til den, komponistenes evner til å utnytte alle dets iboende muligheter og, ikke minst, utøvere som er villige til å eksperimentere og utvikle den nødvendige teknikken for å spille på dem.

Loup Barrow er en av dem som sørger for at Cristalen ikke bare slår oss med sin visuelle prakt men appellerer vel så mye til ørene som til øynene. Vil du vite mer om Barrow kan du gå til nettsiden hans her; mange nye lydlige opplevelser å finne der.

Bangogolufsen beolab90speakers

Med slike instrumenter og med en parallell fantasifull og formmessig utforskning innen HiFi-industrien (som her i Bang& Olufsens fantastiske Beolab90) har visuell undring nok en gang kommet tilbake inn i  lyttersituasjonen.

Artikkelen ble publisert i Audiophile.no 03.01.16

 

 

 

Nutritious living and playing

This has been a rather inspiring and hectic year with certifications, teaching, lecturing and holding weekend courses in Oslo, Tromsø and Trondheim. This summer i got my level 2 certification in Timani and also my certification as a Restorative Exercise Specialist from The Restorative Exercise Institute™ which now has changed name to Nutritious Movement™.

This is a link to their new webpage : http://nutritiousmovement.com/

But the main part of my teaching still centres around Timani, the amazing program developed by Tina Margareta Nilssen for learning how to use the body with a more natural and beneficial coordination, musicians and non-musicians alike.

For musicians the result is a body that allows you to access all the incredibly finely tuned coordination needed to perform music with the body and mind as an active and conscious helper rather than as an adversary which needs to be disciplined, fought or ignored.

www.timanimusic.com

For non-musicians both Timani and Nutritious Movement™ involves a deeper understanding of the coordination needed to use the body in a way that supports it rather than strains it in a negative way. “Affluent diseases” is a term often given to health problems that are seen as a result of modern western living. This includes a diet which is rich in sugar, acid and processed foods combined with a forced sedentary lifestyle. Just like your body needs certain dietary nutrients (vitamins, minerals and trace elements) it also needs its movement-nutrients, as in varied and differentiated use of the whole body.

If you consider you normal day: how many different positions are you dependent on when doing your everyday routines? The most common ones are standing, sitting and walking.

We humans have a tendency to use our bodies in a habitual way. We sit, stand and walk according to a pattern that is largely unconscious  and  automatized which means that we tend to sit, stand and walk in one specific way. Acctually there are a dozen different positions available just when it comes to sitting and variation is the key: even though this message is being pushed all around:1129-1_FONT_fontp7073_movement2.0_poster_a1_aug28

…the main problem is not sitting – it´s sitting in the same way every time, And when it comes to sitting we accually have rather a lot of options for variety. Here are just a few, collected from around the world by anthropologist Gordon Hewes:

sitting postures

Each of these postures gives the body a different form of load and therefore a different kind of movement-nutrient, just as having this as your default-position for 7 hours each day creates the same kind of repeated load and eventually a movement-nutrient-deficiency:

Skjelett

As long as you have a body you can benefit from Timani and Nutritious Movement.

Have a happy, healthy, varied, conscious and nutritious Christmas and New year!

 

Hemmeligheten bak en “naturlig teknikk” – Historien om mannen som mistet kroppen sin

It takes a lot of effort to make something look effortless – Ben Mitchell

The best art always seem effortless – Steven Sondheim

Det sies at konsertpianister benytter en finmotorikk med en koordineringsgrad som ligger over den en hjernekirurg benytter ved operasjoner. Det å formidle et musikkstykke som krever at hver finger, hvert ledd i den fingeren og hver muskel i hånd, arm og kropp samarbeider og bidrar til at det samlede resultatet fremstår som en helhet harmonisk, melodisk og rytmisk er egentlig et aldri så lite fysiologisk og nevrologisk mirakel.

Hånd på klaviatur

Kanskje grunnen til at det likevel ikke oppfattes slik er at når kunst på et høyt nivå fremføres er gjerne et av kjennetegnene at det virker ”uanstrengt”. Og kan hende er det grunnen til at så mange musikere og kunstnere innen fag som krever en nitid kroppskontroll er på leting etter en “naturlig teknikk”? Men hva ligger egentlig bak begrepet “naturlig teknikk”?

Sansen vi ikke vet vi har

Det ikke så mange tenker over er hvor mange av våre tilsynelatende dagligdagse handlinger som er liknende mirakler, nevrologisk og fysiologisk sett.

Skjelett – Kopi

Grunnlaget for at vi i det hele tatt er i stand til å bevege oss er samarbeidet som eksisterer mellom hjernen vår, nervesystemet vårt og musklene våre, et samarbeid som kan gjøre oss i stand til alt fra å knytte skolissene til å spille en pianokonsert.Brain

Ikke alle har behov for å spille en pianokonsert eller utføre en hjerteoperasjon, men uavhengig av bruksbehovet vårt så vil de fleste av oss gå gjennom livet mer eller mindre uvitende om de tusenvis av detaljerte mirakuløse prosesser som gjør oss i stand til å utføre de fleste dagligdagse gjøremål. Og en ting gjelder oss alle: det er først når ting ikke lenger fungerer som de skal at vi begynner å ane hvor omfattende dette usynlige samarbeidet mellom hjerne, muskler og nerver virkelig er.

Propriosepsjon er navnet på den sansen som gjør hjernen vår i stand til å vite hvor hver del av kroppen vår til enhver tid befinner seg og som dermed gjør det mulig for hjernen å sende koordinerte signaler i form av motor programmer til kroppen vår – en evne vi tar så for gitt at det omtrent er umulig for oss å forstå hva denne sansen egentlig består i. Så den beste måten å gi et godt bilde av denne sansen på er kanskje å vise hvordan livet til en som må leve uten den arter seg.

Mannen som mistet kroppen sin

ian-watermanDa 19 år gamle Ian Waterman først ble dårlig trodde han det bare dreide seg om en vanlig forkjølelse eller virusinfeksjon. Den kraftige unggutten jobbet som lærling hos en slakter og var vant til å kjøre seg hardt i en utfordrende og fysisk krevende jobb. Han hadde tidligere fått et lite kutt i den ene fingeren og kuttet utviklet seg sannsynligvis til en infeksjon. Det som startet som en vanlig forkjølelse skulle vise seg å være noe mye verre. Mens legene forgjeves forsøkte å forstå hva som foregikk mistet Ian gradvis kontrollen over lemmene  sine og endte opp liggende i en seng uten å kunne styre noen del av kroppen sin fra halsen og ned.

Det som forvirret leger og nevrologer var at tilstanden ikke artet seg som noen alminnelig lammelse: Ian var ikke paralysert, musklene og leddene fungerte fortsatt men hjernens tilgang til dem var blokkert: Ian kunne ikke lenger styre dem til å gjøre det han ville fordi hjernen ikke visste hvor delene befant seg.  Samtidig mottok hjernen hans fortsatt visse signaler fra kroppen, bl.a var han i stand til å føle smerte og temperaturforskjeller.

Dommen fra nevrologene var brutal: resten av livet i en rullestol.

Nerver til besvær

Ians tilstand er en effektiv påminnelse om hvor komplekst og spesialisert nervesystemet vårt er. Vi tenker gjerne på en nerve som en slags kabel som formidler signaler mellom kropp og hjerne. Men virkeligheten er litt mer sammensatt.kabler

Hvis du skjærer gjennom en nerve og tar en titt på tverrsnittet så vil du se at denne nerven inneholder flere mindre deler, nervefasicler,  og inne i hver av disse igjen finner vi individuelle nervefibre.

En nervefiber kan være sensorisk eller motorisk. De motoriske fibrene sender signaler til muskelfibrene om at de skal trekke seg sammen.  De Sensoriske fibrene starter enten i huden eller i muskelen og har forskjellig størrelse: de største formidler informasjon om berøring, muskelfølelse og bevegelsesfølelse mens de minste formidler informasjon om muskeltretthet, temperatur og visse former for smerte.

Hos Ian var de motoriske fibrene inntakt men de store sensoriske fibrene (og dermed også tilgangen til helt spesifikke deler av nervesystemets funksjoner) var skadet, nervefibre som var ansvarlige for å ta inn alle de sensoriske nerveimpulsene som fortalte om leddstillinger og muskelaktivitet og for å mate denne informasjonen videre til hjernen.

Tilstanden, som kan forekomme i ulike grader, fikk etter hvert navnet Sensory Neuropathy: Skadede sensoriske nerver.

En totalt viljestyrt kropp

Ian hadde et avgjørende fortrinn i all uflaksen: han var fortsatt ung da han ble syk. Etter det første sjokket og fortvilelsen over rullestol-dommen fant den unge engelskmannen ut at han ikke ville slå seg til ro med legenes prognoser. Siden de nervene som skulle ha sørget for at hjernen fikk informasjon nødvendig for å bevege kroppen var ødelagte var det nødvendig å skape en ny forbindelse mellom hjerne og kropp. Løsningen, i alle fall halvparten av den,  lå i visualisering.

Ian fant ut at hvis han hadde et helt konkret bilde i hodet sitt av hvilken bevegelse han skulle utføre og deretter benyttet øynene sine som kontroll og feedbackkanal for å fortelle hjernen hvor de delene han skulle bevege befant seg var han i stand til, etter beinhard, årelang opptrening og disiplin, å langsomt og omstendelig kunne styre kroppen sin igjen.Veivalg

Når vi lærer å bevege oss som barn er dette først gjennom grove, store bevegelser som deretter gradvis blir mer og mer fin-koordinert og satt sammen i automatiske mønstre – motor programmer. Dette gjør at vi etter hvert slipper å tenke over alle de små detaljer ved bevegelsen og vi kan frigjøre energi til å tenke på noen annet mens vi sykler, går eller utfører andre koordinerte bevegelsesmønstre. Men det at vi ikke lenger bevisst tenker over hvilken koordinasjonen som må til for å kneppe en knapp betyr ikke at kroppen vår ikke utfører den og en av forutsetningene for slike motor programmer er at hjernen vet hvor delene som skal delta i koordinasjonen befinner seg – at den har et utgangspunkt å jobbe fra.

Uten denne kunnskapen vil hjernen famle i mørke så og si. Ian som etter sykdommen levde i en kropp hvor hjernen ikke lenger kunne benytte noen av de tidligere automatiske bevegelsesmønstrene var nå på et vis tvunget til å gjøre alt ut i fra et nullpunkt: alle koordinasjoner måtte nå gjøres 100% bevisst.

Har du eit personleg problem med tyngdekrafta?”∗

De automatiske motor programmene som vi benytter hver dag er også basert på en innebygget underbevisst forståelse for fysiske lover og hvordan de påvirker kroppen vår.  Denne forståelsen benytter vi oss av daglig, feks hver gang vi skal løfte noe. Et enkelt eksempel: Størrelsen på basen din, det vil si om du står bredbent eller med samlede føtter er avgjørende for om du vil vippe over ende eller ikke hvis du holder noe tungt ut fra kroppen. Her er et visuelt eksempel på hva som skjer om man ikke har denne kunnskapen: kran som tipper

Ian, som ikke lenger har tilgang til sine automatiske motor program må dermed hele tiden forholde seg bevisst til disse generelle lovene: hver gang han skal løfte noe må han beregne hvor mye vekten av gjenstanden vil påvirke balansen i resten av kroppen og deretter justere stillingen på armer og ben og spennings-graden i musklene i dem basert på dette.

Vi tenker sjelden over de fysiske lovene som omgir oss og påvirker oss hver dag. Det er ikke tilfeldig at biomekanikk fortsatt er et relativt ukjent begrep for de fleste. Kunnskapen om hvordan biologisk materiale (les: det som kroppen vår er bygget opp av) påvirkes av fysiske krefter (for eksempel tyngdekraften) er ganske enkelt ikke noe de fleste går rundt og tenker på. Likevel lever vi alle under disse lovene, vi er bare så heldige at vi sjelden trenger å forholde oss bevisst til dem, unntatt ved de anledningene hvor propriosepsjonen vår er en anelse mer svekket enn til vanlig, for eksempel ved beruselse.

For en som Ian som er absolutt avskåret fra denne sansen blir dét å forholde seg bevisst til tyngdekraften en meget bevisst handling. Bl.a blir ansvaret som hviler på øynene og synet altomfattende: så lenge han kan bruke synet til å gi hjernen tilbakemelding om hvor kroppen hans befinner seg er Ian i stand til å styre kroppen sin med en kontroll som han (foreløpig) er alene om i verden. Hvis denne feedbackkanalen forsvinner, for eksempel ved at lyset slås av, mister han øyeblikkelig kontroll over kroppen og faller sammen som en filledukke, et resultat av hjernens mangel på feedback fra kroppen og dermed dens evne til å justere kroppen i forhold til tyngdekraften.

Hjerne søker kropp

file6881288615765Når vi ser små babyer bevege seg langsomt, omstendelig og målbevisst er vi vitne til en omhyggelig opptrening av koordinasjon og motor mønstre som senere skal danne grunnlaget for alle bevegelsene som følger gjennom et langt liv. Det fokuset som barn i denne fasen har når de beveger seg er dypt konsentrert og vi kan fortrylles av hvor “søtt” denne konsentrasjonen rundt handlinger som å kneppe en knapp eller gripe rundt en gjenstand er. Men det som foregår i hjernen under en slik opptreninger er i virkeligheten noe som snarere burde påkalle vår beundring: Skanninger av hjernen til Ian når han utfører sine bevisst koordinerte bevegelser påviser en aktivitet i deler av hjernen som vanligvis kun brukes ved den mest sofistikerte form for intens konsentrasjon, områder som reserveres for handlinger som sjonglering.

I tillegg er det en annen pris som Ian hele tiden betaler men som vi med propriosepsjonen vår i behold slipper å forholde oss til: hjernen vår krever og er avhengig av kontakt med kroppen. Når denne kontakten ikke er der opplever hjernen det som en instinktiv trussel. Å ha denne tilstanden vil altså si at du hele tiden går rundt med et nervesystem mer eller mindre i helspenn og at du konstant er nødt til å gi hjernen visuell feedback for å holde panikken stagget.

Tenk selv hvordan du opplever det å bomme på et trappetrinn når du går ned en trapp. Det hugget som går gjennom oss i dét det forventede støtet fra underlaget ikke kommer er hjernen som roper etter feedback fra kroppen, en feedback som i denne anledningen ikke kom som forventet og som i Ians tilfelle aldri vil komme.

Trapper

Bevisst kroppsbruk og ” bevisst kroppsbruk”

De fleste handlinger som krever en spesielt sofistikert form for kroppskoordinasjon som musikkutøving, dans eller toppidrett fordrer at vi trener opp og bevisstgjør deler av kroppen gjennom øvelser og stadige bevisste repetisjoner. Gjennom dette arbeidet får vi en mer detaljert kontroll over kroppen vår. Vi kan si at denne kontrollen ligger latent i de fleste av oss som en mulighet, selvfølgelig også influert av ting som arv og miljø. Men uansett hvor detaljert og rigorøst vi tror vi styrer kroppen vår: vi kontrollerer bevisst likevel bare en brøkdel av alle de signalene som trengs for å utfør den handlingen vi gjør, konsert, dans eller offpist. Resten av signalene er bygget opp av de uhyre komplekse motor mønstrene som hjernen vår har designet over tid og som vi alle er avhengige av (Ian Waterman er et eksempel på nøyaktig hvor avhengige).

L1030139

En vidtflyvende tanke: vår innebygde fascinasjon for ytre mønstre speiles av at vi selv er fysiologisk og nevrologisk mønster-baserte skapninger.

( For flere tanker rundt fenomenet mønster ta en titt på denne artikkelen)

Det at vi tar disse mønstrene for gitt er kanskje det beste beviset på hvor utrolig sømløst og fininnstilt dette systemet er. Bare når vi er vitne til dette mønstret på sitt ypperste  som på en konsert, en ballett forestilling eller et sportsarrangement kan vi bli slått av dets kompleksitet og imponerende muligheter: når en utøver på toppnivå får noe som er så grunnleggende komplekst til å se ”uanstrengt” ut.

En tilsynelatende uanstrengt teknikk betyr altså ikke, nevrologisk sett, at noe er ”uten anstrengelse” men heller at noe er velfungerende, samkjørt, velkoordinert til det ytterste. Og det er dette som ligger til grunn for en såkalt  ”naturlig spilleteknikk”: ikke en kroppskontroll som kommer av seg selv uten innsats bare vi slapper nok av, men en sofistikert kompleks koordinasjon som gjennom sitt uanstrengte uttrykk viser oss hva vi bærer i oss av muligheter.

 

∗  En takk til Brynhild Winther for bruken av en av hennes tekster som en overskrift i denne bloggen. Anbefaler alle å ta en titt på kunsten hennes her!

Vil du vite mer sjekk ut BBC Horizon- dokumentaren “The man who lost his body” som forteller hele historien om Ian waterman. Her er et lite klipp: