An artistic meeting beyond time

Last Tuesday, the 5 of January the great composer, conductor and pianist Pierre Boulez passed into eternity. As a lifetime explorer of new musical dimensions he has, for me, been a great source of inspiration. The following is an imagined meeting which I personally would have loved to witness and a small tribute to the great and timeless minds of three immaculate artists who, in my view, share the common feature of fearless exploration into Art: Pierre Boulez, Pablo Picasso and Johann Sebastian Bach.

So what if it were possible to create a quiet place beyond the limits of time and allow these three to meet for an amiable chat concerning life and art? To erase the years between them and let them meet as equals, each formed by his own time but also at the same time combined in their mutual love of Art and their own work. What if it were possible to let them meet on neutral ground in a half-fictional setting but at the same time partly real?

The setting of this experience owes its imagery to the books of Lawrence Durrel “The Alexandria Quartet” and Keith Miller “The Book on Fire”. Other sources of inspiration used are: http://www.baroquemusic.org/bqxjsbach.html, an interview with Pierre Boulez by the Magazine Musikblätter (Interview: Wolfgang Schaufler, Transcript: Christopher Roth, Baden-Baden; December 2010) © Universal Edition and a lifetime of quotes, tidbits and remembrances from books, articles and half-heard stories.

Please bear in mind that this is meant as a purely fictional meandering and respectful hommage to three men who have and will continue to have a profound impact on music and art everywhere.

An imagined meeting. Pablo Picasso, Pierre Boulez and johann Sebastian Bach

AlexandriaPablo Picasso, Pierre Boulez and Johann Sebastian Bach are meeting over a pair of Havana cigars and cognac on the terrace of a bar overlooking the harbour in Alexandria. The sky is tall and bright and the three gentlemen are immaculately dressed in white linen suits. Bach has lifted off his wig and placed it on the chair beside him, fanning himself lightly with Boulez´ Panama hat. Picasso squints eagerly into the sun while his hand moves ceaselessly over the drawing pad on his lap. When Boulez urges him to take a short break he excuses himself saying that as he has vowed never to write a diary (to the relief of many of the husbands of his previous mistresses) his pictures will be his only memoires and the pages of his life’s Journal, and this occasion certainly merits to be remembered.

As three friends of old, connected through their creative ideas and passion for their work there is little need to discuss seemingly irrelevant facts like differences in age and language. Instead the conversation invariably turns towards familiar elements like work and life.

Since neither of the three has ever been burdened with unnecessary shyness the conversation flows freely and amiably.

Bach, having finally obtained a position at the Thomas school in Leipzig shares his joy over the new possibilities such a position offers with his friends and the conversation turns towards the subject of artistic freedom.

Boulez: I believe I have finally begun my quest towards my own freedom, friends. I feel as if I have been confined to the crudest building blocks by a hoarding older brother for many years and now he has left home and all of a sudden I found the door to his room ajar and sneaked in and upturned the box under his bed and got creatively drunk on the riches I discovered there!

In many ways you know, Arnold was like a bigger brother to me in creative spirit. Coming home with his bag stuffed full of a strange new language and impressing everyone at the family reunions. I was impressed as well, I admit it. And I learned a lot but at the same time my thoughts were inevitably straying towards the eternal Cain-motif. I needed more, I needed to break free and conquer my own land, my own language, a language with infinitely more freedom than his. And so I began to assemble the blocks in an entirely different way and according to a completely new system, my system.

My system would be a system in which freedom was essential like the totem of the entire country, a freedom like the empty workshop of a mason where only the hammer lies resting on the bench, waiting.

Picasso: But there is always freedom! How else could you create if you have not freedom? If you be a true man your work is bound to be your own and therefore, of course, free.picasso portrett

Bach: But the system is the essence here, Pablo! After all, what is structure and system but a blueprint that shows us the inner structures of existence, no less. No structure, no creation. Of course like all things containing great power it must be mastered…

Picasso: Like with any woman or any blank canvas..

Bach: Never the less it can be mastered but it takes time and hard work, it does not simply fall into one’s lap. Then of course you have to endure the experience of having your beautiful structure completely disintegrated by a third rate musician who cannot even be bothered to play the correct rhythmical ornamentation.

Picasso: For me the system comes with the gut-impulse. I always paint objects as I think them, not as I see them, therefore any system inherent in my thoughts invariably shows itself in my work, I cannot put it there intentionally in order for the art to emerge within it.

As for your talk about Cain-motifs, Pierre: in my opinion every creation starts with destruction. You have to rid yourself of or deliberately destroy any previous notion of what you think you know about something when attempting to describe it. How else can you gain access to its essence, and once you’ve found that: how else can you make an accurate description of it?

Boulez: I believe that is something I can relate to. What finally gave me my stand against my Viennese brothers: I needed to be allowed to describe, to be a painter! You really cannot just be constructive all the time; you have to be descriptive, as well!

Picasso: Perhaps you would like a canvas? But of course when describing something the real question is always “who are you describing for?”

I have been describing the world to so many people and in such an amount of different languages but it was not until I finally started describing it to myself that it really got interesting.

Bach: By “yourself”, you mean the divine core of your own self?

JSBach

Picasso: If there ever is or was a divinity he lives within the perfectly painted line of a woman´s back.. (Smiles)

Bach: Personally I would say that I have never doubted his presence in my music.

After all, gentlemen, did not the great Luther himself one state that it is “when music is sharpened and polished by Art that one begins to see with amazement the great and perfect wisdom of God in his wonderful work of harmony”

But the problem as I see it seems to be that in order to make a living and to be able to live with yourself while making it, your descriptions needs to be accessible to others as well as to yourself.

Unless of course you are very wealthy and may do as you please.

God knows I tried in my youth, my head bursting with the new ideas from the evening songs, with the new possibilities! All of these new ideas literally pouring from my fingertips! And what do they say?? “Surprising variations and irrelevant ornaments which obliterate the melody and confuse the congregation”. (Mumbles and reaches for his glass) As if three months is such an enormous amount of lost time…

Boulez: In that case I am thankful for our differences in time. At least I had the fortune of being born into a world where creating your own language can be seen as a valid line of work. Although of course merely trying to oppose old structures can easily get you artistically dismissed as an attention-hungry musician.

No, the skill that must be “mastered” has for me always been the skill of balance, the delicate balance between constructivism on the one hand and spontaneity on the other. For me, these are the two elements of a true musician.

Bach: Hah! Spontaneity! a lost art in deed. You know, there were times when I felt myself suffocating underneath all of these innumerable careful souls. People who lived by rules, never venturing outside of what they had been taught were possible. Especially the organ builders! At times I would give them all a good fright just to get back into a happy mood. Pulling out all the stops on the organ and letting the instrument make its loudest sound ever always made them all go quite white. I used to say that I needed to hear whether the organ had a good lung (chuckles) Ah, but that sound, gentlemen, what an experience!

You know, Pierre, I quite envy you your enormous palette of sound. What I could have done with such a palette…

Picasso: It is still just a palette. What use is a palette without the ability to wield the brush? Not that you of all people lack that ability, my friend. (smiles and places his hand briefly on Bach´s shoulder) My point is only that the wielding, or maybe more accurately the will to wield is infinitely more important that what you happen to be wielding at the moment.

Boulez: I must certainly say that your palette has changed considerably during your lifetime, Pablo. But at the same time your brush stays true.

(softly, far away the call from the surrounding muezzins starts weaving random harmonies through the afternoon air)Vindussprosser

Will you listen to that! You know, in spite of all this talk of brushes and personal ways of wielding them; sitting here with this magnificent view I am very glad that we decided to meet here as this journey has given me the possibility to enrich my pallet with new sounds and impulses, to absorb this culture and all of its lovely sounds and to take it all back with me to replenish my “brush”. I almost feel like a thief, hoarding riches into the purse of my imagination..

Bach: I was doing the same! There are some very interesting harmonic progressions happening here (pulls out a feather pen and ink bottle and starts jotting down a figured bass on the napkin)

Picasso: And of course you know, my friends, bad artists copy but good artists steal.

 

 

Musikk for ører og øyne

Dagens omfattende opptaksteknologi gir oss i dag tilgang på musikk overalt og i alle settinger. Musikk er på sett og vis blitt et legemsløst fenomen: det er i dag fullt mulig å ha hørt flere hundre pianokonserter uten noen gang å ha sett et flygel. Har det noe å si? Tatt i betraktning i hvor stor grad sansene våre vikler seg inn i hverandre og påvirker hverandre så er det fristende å tenke at  det ligger en lite forskjell her – at det visuelle aspektet ved en musikkopplevelse kan ha noe å si for den totale lytteropplevelsen.

Mens vi i dag nærmeste drukner i tilgjengelig musikk gjennom alle tenkelige kanaler og formater var musikk før opptaksteknologiens tilblivelse mer av en ferskvare og konserter var den eneste anledningen til å få oppleve den. Den musikalske opplevelsen krevde dermed at du som lytter var i nærheten av instrumentene som frembrakte musikken og dermed var den visuelle delen av en lytteropplevelse også knyttet til instrumentene og deres utforming. Særlig i tidligere tider kunne disse instrumentene anta ganske så imponerende former.

 Instrumentale møbler

På 17 og 1800-tallet var huskonserter vanlig i de øvre middelklasse-hjemmene. Musikkutdanning var en viktig del av spesielt unge damers allmenndannelse. Dermed var det også vanligere at instrumenter var en naturlig del av hjemmene og et mondent borgerhjem var gjerne forventet å ha i det minste ett tangentinstrument. Flere av disse instrumentene hadde dermed en visuell utsmykning som også gjorde dem til dekorative møbler.

Bildetekst: The Concert av Gerard ter Borch

The concert Gerard_ter_Borch

ClavecinRuckers&Taskin

Sammenlignet med dagens mer edruelige modeller kan tidligere tiders instrumenter imponere og beta oss med sin overflod av vakre detaljer.

Skulpturell skjønnhet og eksperimentering

9.1275404555.giraffe-piano

17 og 1800-tallet var også en tid hvor forløperne til mange av vår tids instrumenter gikk gjennom flere eksperimentelle stadier, både teknisk og utformingsmessig; sidespor som noen ganger endte i ganske fantasifulle resultater.

Giraffpianoet er et slikt kuriøst monster. I 1820 hadde herskeren av Egypt forært en giraff til zoologisk hage i Wien og alt i hele byen dreide seg plutselig om giraffer – fra hårfrisyrer og kjeks til utformingen av vinglass. I byens dansesalonger danset man en ny dans kalt giraffgalopp og på musikkfronten fikk man en ny instrumenthybrid: giraffpianoet – et flygel som var mindre plasskrevende og dermed lettere å bringes inn i middelklassens stuer. Instrumentet minnet om et flygel hvor den buede delen av instrumentkroppen var blitt kuttet av og plassert på høykant bak klaviaturet.  Giraffpianoet kom i flere fantasifulle utsmykninger og var en fryd for så vel øyne som ører.

734-090605Revival-GiraffePiano.standalone.prod_affiliate.79

Instrumentene på denne tiden ga altså lytterne en stadig variert strøm av visuell informasjon, gjerne med fokus på det som i tiden ble ansett som vakkert eller slående og det er fristende å tro at det visuelle også bidro i lyttesituasjonen.

Når visse HiFi-produkter i dag kan sies å nærme seg det rent skulpturelle er det en spennende tanke at det på et vis kan være et svar på tapet av den visuelle opplevelsen som nærheten til musikkinstrumenter en gang ga. HiFi industrien kan på et vis sies å ha tatt over ansvaret for å bringe den skulpturelle skjønnheten (som det før var instrumentene som sto for) tilbake inn i lyttesituasjonen.

mbl101extreme

Mbl´s  Radialstrahler 101 X-treme. Høyttaler og smykke i ett.

Det er kanskje ikke tilfeldig at Mbl i et intervju med monoandstereo.com beskriver denne kreasjonen som ” … high-end instruments that create genuinely lifelike music in your living room.”

Skiftende idealer

Skjønnhetsidealer har alltid vært kulturelt betingede fenomener og det er bare å bla i en kunsthistoriebok for å se at idealene har endret seg betraktelig oppgjennom tidene. Så også i instrumentverdenen: Selv om standardinstrumenter i dag fortsatt har en iboende skjønnhet er det ikke primært det visuelle aspektet ved dem som ansees som det viktigste. Først og fremst skal de jo kunne frembringe vakker musikk.

Allikevel finnes det de som fortsetter å legge vekt på det visuelle aspektet ved instrumentene, noen ganger med fantasifulle resultat.

schimmel-grand-piano-pegasus-by-luigi-colani

Når vi ser Luigi Colanis flygelfantasi ovenfor er det fristende å tenke at ringen er sluttet fra de visuelt overdådige eksemplene blant instrumentene på  17-1800 tallet og frem til i dag. Men instrumentet ovenfor er allikevel først og fremst et instrument. Hvis det ikke var i stand til å produsere lyden vi forventer fra et flygel vil det også tape en god del av sin status.

Men hva med instrumenter hvor det visuelle aspektet er like viktig som det auditive?

Syngende skulpturer

Som henholdsvis skulptør og ingeniør dannet brødrene Francois og Bernhard Baschet en uvanlig og fantasimessig eksplosiv kunstnerisk duo.

baschetbrothers

Fra 1950-årene og framover konstruerte de to franskmennene flerfoldige musikalske skulpturer hvor skillet mellom instrument og skulptur er ytterst vag. Brødrene selv så på verkene sine som skulpturer som også var i stand til å produsere musikk. Skulptur-objektene deres, som ofte består av materialer som metall, glass og tre, er både vakre å se på og fascinerende å lytte til.

Som grunnlag for det hele ligger en nitid utforskning av akustiske fenomener. Med vitenskapelig grundighet startet brødrene med å klassifisere allerede eksisterende musikkinstrumenter. De kom opp med en oversikt over fire grunnleggende egenskaper som gikk igjen hos de fleste av dem:

  •  Muligheten for å produsere periodiske vibrasjoner
  • Muligheten for å opprettholde disse vibrasjonene
  • Muligheten for å frembringe en skala og modulere tonehøyde
  • Muligheten for å forsterke en lyd

Med en metodisk grundighet gikk brødrene dermed i gang med å lage skulpturer hvor disse fire egenskapene skulle danne de grunnleggende premissene.

baschetinstrumenter

I tillegg bestemte de seg for å inkludere enda et element, nemlig resonatorer, elementer som kan bevege seg synkront med lyden som skapes og forsterke den. (Disse finner vi også hos enkelte musikkinstrumenter, blant annet har hardingfelen et dobbelt sett med strenger hvor det nederst er der for å vibrere synkront med og å skape resonans til klangen skapt av de øverste strengene.)

hardingfele

Av hensyn til resonansmulighetene ble metall derfor et viktig materiale i mange av skulpturene.

Er dét kunst?

Den uvante kombinasjonen av instrument og skulptur har også bidratt til å endre definisjonen av kunstbegrepet: Da de musikalske skulpturene skulle sendes til USA for å stilles ut på MOMA, Museum of Modern Art, ble de stoppet i tollen. Ifølge tollmyndighetene i USA var nemlig kunst på den tiden definert gjennom sin unyttighet(!) og siden skulpturene til Baschet-brødrene var i stand til å produsere musikk var de dermed ikke lenger unyttige og derfor pålagt 16% toll og avgifter.

Baschet plakat

Saken havnet i retten hvor Baschet-brødrene fikk god hjelp og støtte fra kunstmiljøet i New York og fra presedensen skapt av en tidligere rettssak rundt kunstneren Brancusi (Da Brancusi første gangen sendte sine kunstverk til USA for å stilles ut ble også de stoppet i tollen med en kommentar om at dette ikke var kunst men stener som ikke lignet noe og slikt noe var det toll på.) På lik linje med Brancusi vant også Baschet-brødrene frem i retten og de musikalske skulpturene deres bidro dermed til diskusjonen rundt hva som skulle defineres som kunst.

De instrumentale skulpturene gjorde stor lykke på museene hvor de ble stilt ut, for i motsetning til skulpturutstillinger flest som hadde et vell av små skilt med “ikke rør!” plassert rundt seg var Bashet-skulpturene akkompagnert av små skilt med oppfordringer til publikum om å “spille/leke” med verkene (en dobbeltmening ved bruken av ordet play). dermed var gjerne utstillingssalene fulle av voksne og barn som stimlet rundt verkene i lykkelig klanglig utforskning.

The Crystal Organ

cristal

Men for å utnytte de musikalske mulighetene til de skulpturelle instrumentene fullt ut var det nødvendig med musikalsk kompetanse og Baschetbrødrene startet et samarbeid med flere etablerte musikere hvor enkelte av skulpturene nå tok steget over i instrumentenes verden. Sammen med musikerekteparet Jacques og Yvonne Lasry etablerte de ensembelet Lasry-Baschet Sound Structures mens musikeren Michel Deneuve fikk en spesiell forkjærlighet for instrumentet Cristal  (også kalt The Cristal Baschet) og bidro til å utvikle dette til et virtuost instrument egnet både for solo spill og orkester som brukes i moderne musikk i dag.

Cristalen tilhører en gruppe instrumenter som kalles friksjonsidiofoner  hvor tonene skapes ved hjelp av friksjon, i dette tilfellet strykes glasstenger med fuktede fingre og vibrasjonene som skapes forsterkes så av store metallresonatorer som kan minne om enorme blomsterblad. (Teknikken med å produsere musikk ved å gni på glass har vært brukt i flere varianter helt tilbake til 1700tallet da  ingen ringere enn Benjamin Franklin utviklet glassharmonikaen, men mer om det en annen gang.)

En av dem som har innlemmet Cristalen i sitt klanglige univers er multiinstrumentalisten og komponisten Loup Barrow. Her er han i et spennende samspill med Cristal, Hang og Ondes Martenot med Locus Solus Orchestra:

Nye instrumenter og nye komponister

Det er kanskje lett at instrumenter som har et såpass sterkt visuelt særpreg ender opp som mer av en wow-effekt enn en musikalsk opplevelse, og det skal ikke nektes for at Cristalen er et slående innslag på en konsertscene. Med sin kombinasjon av vitenskapelig teknologi, estetisk skjønnhet og fantasieggende klangmuligheter er Cristalen og de andre lydskulpturene til Baschetbrødrene en moderne vri på tidligere tiders instrumentale fantasifullhet.

Samtidig er gjerne et instruments levedyktighet mest av alt knyttet til musikken som skrives til den, komponistenes evner til å utnytte alle dets iboende muligheter og, ikke minst, utøvere som er villige til å eksperimentere og utvikle den nødvendige teknikken for å spille på dem.

Loup Barrow er en av dem som sørger for at Cristalen ikke bare slår oss med sin visuelle prakt men appellerer vel så mye til ørene som til øynene. Vil du vite mer om Barrow kan du gå til nettsiden hans her; mange nye lydlige opplevelser å finne der.

Bangogolufsen beolab90speakers

Med slike instrumenter og med en parallell fantasifull og formmessig utforskning innen HiFi-industrien (som her i Bang& Olufsens fantastiske Beolab90) har visuell undring nok en gang kommet tilbake inn i  lyttersituasjonen.

Artikkelen ble publisert i Audiophile.no 03.01.16